Frozen Shoulder Stages You Need To Know

by admin on June 16, 2015

There are typically three different stages of frozen shoulder, each lasting up to several months.
Any shoulder movement can cause pain during the freezing stage, and you may notice a limited range of motion. During the frozen stage, it becomes more difficult to use your shoulder, as it becomes stiffer, although you should experience less actual pain. The motion begins to return during the third stage, the thawing stage.
There are various factors increasing your chances of developing frozen shoulder, and the chiropractic and shoulder pain and discomfort are often worse at night, especially while sleeping.

Age and Sex and Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder is more common in women, and in both men and women aged 40 or over.

Reduced Mobility from Frozen Shoulder

A broken arm or a stroke can lead to reduced mobility, as can systematic diseases, recovering from surgery or a rotator cuff injury. An extended period of immobility can increase the chances of developing frozen shoulder.
 Frozen shoulder is more likely to occur in those with certain diseases. These include cardiovascular disease, Parkinson’s disease, thyroid conditions, diabetes and tuberculosis.
Consult Dr. Richard J. Werner DC for Frozen Shoulder and Chiropractic Care in Houston, Texas
There are typically three different stages of frozen shoulder, each lasting up to several months.
Any shoulder movement can cause pain during the freezing stage, and you may notice a limited range of motion. During the frozen stage, it becomes more difficult to use your shoulder, as it becomes stiffer, although you should experience less actual pain. The motion begins to return during the third stage, the thawing stage.
There are various factors increasing your chances of developing frozen shoulder, and the chiropractic and shoulder pain and discomfort are often worse at night, especially while sleeping.
Age and Sex
Frozen shoulder is more common in women, and in both men and women aged 40 or over.
Reduced Mobility
A broken arm or a stroke can lead to reduced mobility, as can systematic diseases, recovering from surgery or a rotator cuff injury. An extended period of immobility can increase the chances of developing frozen shoulder.
 Frozen shoulder is more likely to occur in those with certain diseases. These include cardiovascular disease, Parkinson’s disease, thyroid conditions, diabetes and tuberculosis.

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